Fedora logo redesign update

As we’ve talked about here in a couple of posts now, the Fedora design team has been working on a refresh of the Fedora logo. I wanted to give an update on the progress of the project. We have received a lot of feedback on the design from blog comments, comments on the ticket, and through social media and chat. The direction of the design has been determined by that feedback, while also keeping in mind our goal of making this project a refresh / update and not a complete redesign. Where we left off Here are the candidates we left off with in the last blog post on this project: Candidate #1 Candidate #2 How we’ve iterated Here’s what we’ve worked on since presenting those two logo candidates, in detail. Candidate #2 Dropped Based on feedback, one of the first things we decided to do was to drop candidate #2 out of the running and focus on candidate #1. According to the feedback, candidate #1 is closer to the current logo. Again, a major goal was to to iterate what we had – keeping closer to our current logo seemed in keeping with that. Redesign of ‘a’ One of …

Which new Fedora logo design do you prefer?

As I mentioned in an earlier post, the Fedora design team has been working on a refresh of the Fedora logo. This work started in a Fedora design ticket at the request of the Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller, and has been discussed openly in the ticket, on the council list, on the design-team list, and within the Fedora Council including at their recent hackfest. In this post, I’d like to do the following: First, outline the history of our logo and how it got to where it is today. It’s important to understand the full context of the logo when analyzing it and considering change. I’d then like to talk about some of the challenges we’ve faced with the current iteration of our logo for the past few years, with some concrete examples. I want you to know there are solid and clear reasons why we need to iterate our logo – this isn’t something we’re doing for change’s sake. Finally, I’d like to present two proposals the Fedora Design Team has created for the next iteration of our logo – we would very much like to hear your feedback and understand what direction you’d prefer us to go …

Flock Cod Logo Ideas

Ryan Lerch put together an initial cut at a Flock 2017 logo and website design (flock2017-WIP branch of fedora-websites). It was an initial cut he offered for me to play with; in trying to work on some logistics for Flock to make sure things happen on time I felt locking in on a final logo design would be helpful at this point. Here is the initial cut of the top part of the website with the first draft logo: Overall, this is very Cape Cod. Ryan created a beautiful piece of work in the landscape illustration and the overall palette. Honestly, this would work fine as-is, but there were a few points of critique for the logo specifically that I decided to explore – There weren’t any standard Fedora fonts in it; I considered at least the date text could be in one of the standard Fedora fonts to tie back to Fedora / Flock. The standard ‘Flock’ logotype wasn’t used either; generally we try to keep stuff with logotypes in that logotype (if anything, so it seems more official.) The color palette is excellent and evocative of Cape Cod, but maybe some Fedora accent colors could tie it into …

A logo for cri-o

Dan Walsh recently asked me if I could come up with a logo for a project he is involved with – cri-o. The “cri” of cri-o stands for Container Runtime Interface. The CRI is a different project – the CRI is an API between Kubernetes (container orchestration) and various container runtimes. cri-o is a runtime – like rkt or Docker – that can run containers that are compliant with OCI (Open Containers Initiative) specification. (Some more info on this is here.) Dan and Antonio suggested a couple of ideas at the outset: Since the project means to connect to Kubernetes via the CRI, it might be neat to have some kind of nod to Kubernetes. Kubernetes’ logo is a nautical one (the wheel of a ship, with 7 spokes.) If you say cri-o out loud, it kind of sounds like cyro, e.g., icy-cool like Mr. Freeze from Batman! If we want to go for a mascot, a mammoth might be a neat one (from an icy time.) So I had two initial ideas, riffing off of those: I tried to think of something nautical and frozen that might relate to Kubernetes in a reasonable way given what cri-o actually does. …

A New Logo for Hyperkitty

I was working on Fedora Hubs and I needed a nice icon for Hyperkitty for some feed widget mockups I was working on. I really love the updated Pagure logo Ryan Lerch made for pagure.io: Pagure and Hyperkitty, you know, they are kind of cousins, so they should look like they are part of the same family, no? 🙂 So here’s what I came up with, what do you think? (SVG available here.)

Fedora Atomic Logo Idea

The Fedora Cloud Working Group recently decided that in Fedora 24 (or perhaps a bit further out depending on how the tooling/process can support it) that the Atomic version of Fedora is going to be the primary focus of the working group. (Background discussion on their list is available too.) This has an affect on the Fedora website as the Fedora Cloud edition shifts from a buffet of kind of equally-positioned cloud- and container-related images to a more focused set of images optimized for container hosting (using Atomic) and a set of more clearly ancillary images that are also useful for cloud/container deployment of Fedora that aren’t based on the Atomic platform. We need to position these images accordingly on the website to meet the new model. Matthew Miller and I discussed how the Cloud WG decision might effect the website and ideas for how we could update the website to suit for Fedora 24. One idea for how we could do this: Consider replacing the “Cloud” edition slot on the front of getfedora.org with a Fedora “Atomic” edition brand. Convert getfedora.org/cloud to focus instead solely on Atomic (maybe redoing the URL to getfedora.org/atomic). Build out a separate cloud image …

A logo & icon for DevAssistant

This is a simple story about a logo design process for an open source project in case it might be informative or entertaining to you. 🙂 A little over a month ago, Tomas Radej contacted me to request a logo for DevAssistant. DevAssistant is a UI aimed at making developers’ lives easier by automating a lot of the menial tasks required to start up a software project – setting up the environment, starting services, installing dependencise, etc. His team was gearing up for a new release and really wanted a logo to help publicize the release. They came to me for help as colleagues familiar with some of the logo work I’ve done. When I first received Tomas’ request, I reviewed DevAsisstant’s website and had some questions: Are there any parent or sibling projects to this one that have logos we’d need this to match up with? Is an icon needed that coordinates with the logo as well? There is existing artwork on the website (shown above) – should the logo coordinate with that? Is that design something you’re committed to? Are there any competing projects / products (even on other platforms) that do something similar? (Just as a ‘competitive’ …

A logo & icon for DevAssistant

This is a simple story about a logo design process for an open source project in case it might be informative or entertaining to you. 🙂 A little over a month ago, Tomas Radej contacted me to request a logo for DevAssistant. DevAssistant is a UI aimed at making developers’ lives easier by automating a lot of the menial tasks required to start up a software project – setting up the environment, starting services, installing dependencise, etc. His team was gearing up for a new release and really wanted a logo to help publicize the release. They came to me for help as colleagues familiar with some of the logo work I’ve done. When I first received Tomas’ request, I reviewed DevAsisstant’s website and had some questions: Are there any parent or sibling projects to this one that have logos we’d need this to match up with? Is an icon needed that coordinates with the logo as well? There is existing artwork on the website (shown above) – should the logo coordinate with that? Is that design something you’re committed to? Are there any competing projects / products (even on other platforms) that do something similar? (Just as a ‘competitive’ …