A logo for cri-o

Dan Walsh recently asked me if I could come up with a logo for a project he is involved with – cri-o. The “cri” of cri-o stands for Container Runtime Interface. The CRI is a different project – the CRI is an API between Kubernetes (container orchestration) and various container runtimes. cri-o is a runtime – like rkt or Docker – that can run containers that are compliant with OCI (Open Containers Initiative) specification. (Some more info on this is here.) Dan and Antonio suggested a couple of ideas at the outset: Since the project means to connect to Kubernetes via the CRI, it might be neat to have some kind of nod to Kubernetes. Kubernetes’ logo is a nautical one (the wheel of a ship, with 7 spokes.) If you say cri-o out loud, it kind of sounds like cyro, e.g., icy-cool like Mr. Freeze from Batman! If we want to go for a mascot, a mammoth might be a neat one (from an icy time.) So I had two initial ideas, riffing off of those: I tried to think of something nautical and frozen that might relate to Kubernetes in a reasonable way given what cri-o actually does. …

The Fedora Design Team's Inkscape/Badges Workshop!

This past weekend, the Fedora Design Team held an Inkscape and Fedora Badges workshop at Red Hat’s office in Westford, Massachusetts. (You can see our public announcement here.) Why did the Fedora Design Team hold this event? At our January 2015 FAD, one of the major themes of things we wanted to do as a team was outreach, to both help teach Fedora and the FLOSS creative tools set as a platform for would-be future designers, as well as to bring more designers into our team. We planned to do a badges workshop at some future point to try to achieve that goal, and this workshop (which was part of a longer Design FAD event I’ll detail in another post) was it. We collectively feel that designing artwork for badges is a great “gateway contribution” for Fedora contributors because: The badges artwork standards and process is extremely well-documented. The artwork for a badge is a small, atomic unit of contribution that does not take up too much of a contributor’s time to create. Badges individually touch on varying areas of the Fedora project, so by making a single badge you could learn (in a rather gentle way) how a particular …

A logo & icon for DevAssistant

This is a simple story about a logo design process for an open source project in case it might be informative or entertaining to you. 🙂 A little over a month ago, Tomas Radej contacted me to request a logo for DevAssistant. DevAssistant is a UI aimed at making developers’ lives easier by automating a lot of the menial tasks required to start up a software project – setting up the environment, starting services, installing dependencise, etc. His team was gearing up for a new release and really wanted a logo to help publicize the release. They came to me for help as colleagues familiar with some of the logo work I’ve done. When I first received Tomas’ request, I reviewed DevAsisstant’s website and had some questions: Are there any parent or sibling projects to this one that have logos we’d need this to match up with? Is an icon needed that coordinates with the logo as well? There is existing artwork on the website (shown above) – should the logo coordinate with that? Is that design something you’re committed to? Are there any competing projects / products (even on other platforms) that do something similar? (Just as a ‘competitive’ …

A logo & icon for DevAssistant

This is a simple story about a logo design process for an open source project in case it might be informative or entertaining to you. 🙂 A little over a month ago, Tomas Radej contacted me to request a logo for DevAssistant. DevAssistant is a UI aimed at making developers’ lives easier by automating a lot of the menial tasks required to start up a software project – setting up the environment, starting services, installing dependencise, etc. His team was gearing up for a new release and really wanted a logo to help publicize the release. They came to me for help as colleagues familiar with some of the logo work I’ve done. When I first received Tomas’ request, I reviewed DevAsisstant’s website and had some questions: Are there any parent or sibling projects to this one that have logos we’d need this to match up with? Is an icon needed that coordinates with the logo as well? There is existing artwork on the website (shown above) – should the logo coordinate with that? Is that design something you’re committed to? Are there any competing projects / products (even on other platforms) that do something similar? (Just as a ‘competitive’ …

The SELinux Coloring Book

Dan Walsh had a great idea for explaining SELinux policy concepts in a fun way – creating an SELinux coloring book! He wrote up a script, I illustrated it using my Wacom in Inkscape on Fedora, and we turned it into an opensource.com article. Still. We needed physical coloring books, and what better place to hand them out than at the Red Hat Summit? We got them printed up and shipped off to the Summit (some in assorted volunteers’ baggage 🙂 ), and they’ve been so popular that Dan is getting close to running out, except a reserve he’s kept for the SELinux for Mere Mortals talk later today. We also handed out some slightly imperfect misprints in the Westford Red Hat office, and we’ve been told a co-worker’s daughter brought hers to pre-school and it was a big hit – the other kids want their own. When it comes to SELinux, we’re starting ’em young on the setenforce 1 path. 🙂 How might you get your own copy? Well, we’ve made the coloring book, including the text and artwork, available under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike license. So download, print, share, remix, and enjoy! 🙂 Download SELinux Coloring Book …

How to Produce Vector EPS with CMYK Color Using Free Software

This may not be the sexiest or even the most contemporaneous task to want to do in 2013, but recently I’ve had to deal with a vendor who requires vector EPS (PDF is not acceptable) and CMYK color for print items such as T-shirts and other swag. The problem with this deceivingly innocuous and charmingly antiquated specification is that it is was very difficult to do in FLOSS. I’ve tried what I thought was every permutation of exporting from every file format available in Inkscape and Scribus, and casting that output together with ghostscript tools in all the ways I could think of. The best results I could achieve was an EPS file with CMYK color that was rasterized, not vector. I was not the only one experiencing this issue. Some folks in the Libre Graphics community that I respect very much had the same problem. Ray suggested some things I could do to troubleshoot the issue that I hadn’t tried to try to coax the output I needed out of Inkscape and/or Scribus. Since I have 3 projects I’m dealing with that require interacting with this particular vendor, I’ve been more motivated than ever to find a libre way …

GTK3 UI Template for Inkscape

Suchakra asked me today if I had a GTK3 template for doing UI mockups in Inkscape, and I realized even though I had put one together some months ago, I never posted it. So here it is, enjoy (if you need a license, let’s say it is GPL+, attribute the GNOME project; the icons are GPL+): GTK3 UI Template for Inkscape (SVG.GZ Inkscape file) Architect’s Daughter font (used in the template, OFL licensed)

Interactive SVG Mockups with Inkscape & Javascript

Update: I have a much more efficient, awesome version of this almost ready to write up, thanks to the awesome help you gave me in the comments. Thanks so much! I’ll post it soon. Yes, it is clickable. Please click it! Can’t see the loveliness? Click here. The backstory So I’ve been working on non-Fedora projects for the past few weeks, and I just started digging back into the Anaconda mockups this morning. Coming back to UI design from a slight break seemed to magnify issues that I feel in 2011 there must exist a solution–like defining clickable areas within mockups and linking them together to make lightweight interactive prototypes. (Right? ….right?!) The Dark Side offers cookies After some failed attempts to embed JQuery into SVG (if you’ve achieved this or know it to be a nutty proposition, please school me!) I got really frustrated and signed up for a free-as-in-beer and proprietary site to see what was possible. I found a site that lets you upload flat PNG mockups and then drag out clickable areas. Per clickable area, you can define what mockup to load next via a dropdown of all uploaded mockups. It also lets you add people …

Interactive SVG Mockups with Inkscape & Javascript

Update: I have a much more efficient, awesome version of this almost ready to write up, thanks to the awesome help you gave me in the comments. Thanks so much! I’ll post it soon. Yes, it is clickable. Please click it! Can’t see the loveliness? Click here. The backstory So I’ve been working on non-Fedora projects for the past few weeks, and I just started digging back into the Anaconda mockups this morning. Coming back to UI design from a slight break seemed to magnify issues that I feel in 2011 there must exist a solution–like defining clickable areas within mockups and linking them together to make lightweight interactive prototypes. (Right? ….right?!) The Dark Side offers cookies After some failed attempts to embed JQuery into SVG (if you’ve achieved this or know it to be a nutty proposition, please school me!) I got really frustrated and signed up for a free-as-in-beer and proprietary site to see what was possible. I found a site that lets you upload flat PNG mockups and then drag out clickable areas. Per clickable area, you can define what mockup to load next via a dropdown of all uploaded mockups. It also lets you add people …