Vote on the Fedora 19 Supplemental Wallpapers!

As of right now (April 17 at 12:00 midnight UTC) the Fedora 19 Supplemental Wallpaper Election is open to all Fedora account holders who have signed the Fedora Project Contributor Agreement and are an approved member of at least one non-cla group. (So no, you can’t sign up for an account today and vote. 🙂 ) We have 52 gorgeous and openly-licensed contributions from the Fedora community. The top 16 – ranked according to your votes – will be included in Fedora 19 as supplemental wallpapers. What are supplemental wallpapers? They are wallpapers that we package and ship with the release that users can choose from if they decide not to use the default wallpaper (the latter is created collaboratively by the Fedora Design Team.) This election will be open for three days only, and will close at 11:59 PM UTC on this Friday, April 19th. So don’t wait – if you’d like a say in which wallpapers we include in Fedora 19, go ahead and vote now! 🙂 We’re using the Fedora voting system for this election; it’s not ideally suited to such an election (it can’t display images inline where you rank each wallpaper) so we are recommending …

Fedora 18 Wallpaper Hackfest Report

It’s about that time in our current 6-month-driven cycle to start figuring out the wallpaper for Fedora 18. Ryan Lerch made the first call on the Fedora Design Team mailing list. We started discussing possibilities over IRC in #fedora-design; gnokii kept us on task and made a lot of great suggestions to help us move forward. So we proposed a Fedora 18 wallpaper brainstorm / virtual hackfest for the wallpaper, which happened today! I’m really excited about how well the virtual hackfest went today, and I think we’ve now got a great set of concepts and mockups for it. I want to talk a little bit first about how we organized the hackfest and the high-level progress we made, then I want to dive into a bit of discussion on the six proposals we worked on today. Hackfest Organization / High-level progress We first got together in #fedora-design, and the first agenda item was the Fedora 18 schedule. Jreznik told us that we should have the artwork ready by Friday, August 10th, and packaged by August 14th. We talked a little bit about what we would do with all of the proposals – we definitely want to ship more than …

Fedora 17 Artwork Assets & New Sleeve Text

Fedora’s artwork, including our print-ready media art and other collateral, are produced by the Fedora community, much of it by the Fedora Design Team (our Ambassadors team creates some as well!) Alexander’s F17 media sleeves design For the past several releases, Alexander Smirnov has created and maintained our media artwork, countdown banners, and with Fedora 17 he’s released a fantastic release party poster. He is doing a truly kickass job and is a real hero for us, so if you see him around please thank him! He was also the artist who created Fedora 17’s beefy and miraculous fireworks wallpaper, using Inkscape of course. 🙂 Here’s a run-down of the designs he has produced for Fedora 17 including the source files: Disk Labels and Sleeves (there are separate versions for EMEA to accommodate their printing requirements.) Fedora 17 Fireworks Wallpaper artwork Fedora 17 Release Poster Fedora 17 countdown banner for fedoraproject.org Alexander’s fantastic F17 release poster design More Stuff! Here’s some more Fedora 17 release resources that may come in handy for you: Fedora 17 Screenshots – these were created by Kévin Raymond and feature various desktops available in Fedora as well as the default GNOME 3 shell. List of …

Fedora 17 Artwork Assets & New Sleeve Text

Fedora’s artwork, including our print-ready media art and other collateral, are produced by the Fedora community, much of it by the Fedora Design Team (our Ambassadors team creates some as well!) Alexander’s F17 media sleeves design For the past several releases, Alexander Smirnov has created and maintained our media artwork, countdown banners, and with Fedora 17 he’s released a fantastic release party poster. He is doing a truly kickass job and is a real hero for us, so if you see him around please thank him! He was also the artist who created Fedora 17’s beefy and miraculous fireworks wallpaper, using Inkscape of course. 🙂 Here’s a run-down of the designs he has produced for Fedora 17 including the source files: Disk Labels and Sleeves (there are separate versions for EMEA to accommodate their printing requirements.) Fedora 17 Fireworks Wallpaper artwork Fedora 17 Release Poster Fedora 17 countdown banner for fedoraproject.org Alexander’s fantastic F17 release poster design More Stuff! Here’s some more Fedora 17 release resources that may come in handy for you: Fedora 17 Screenshots – these were created by Kévin Raymond and feature various desktops available in Fedora as well as the default GNOME 3 shell. List of …

Grub 2 theme for Fedora 17

Fedora 17’s grub2 screen won’t be the ugly black and white thing you saw in Fedora 16. The reason for the ugliness in Fedora 16’s grub splash is that it was the first release we used grub2 and there were some missing files that prevented the theme from working at all. We punted on it because grub’s splash is not shown by default and we had higher-priority issues to work on for Fedora 16. Spot and Peter Jones figured out how to get grub2 theming to work properly for Fedora 17 so we have this design now, put together as we hashed it out on the Fedora design team list. It’s using the background from Alexander Smirnov’s excellent fireworks design; the menu box is slightly modified from the grub2 default shipped theme (called ‘starfield.’) I made a video showing it as well, but it’s shaky and nothing amazing. One thing visible in the video though – there’s a quick flicker before the graphical boot menu comes up, and after rebooting multiple times to try to read it Spot figured out it says something about a missing en.mo.gz locale file. If you have any ideas on how we can fix this …

Adventures in recruiting new free software ninjas video

Chris Macken totally rocks. He’s in the process of posting the videos he filmed at Boston Software Freedom Day 2011, with some really nice editing and titling. Above is the video of my keynote he put together. (the slides are here.) In case the embedding doesn’t work on planet, click the screenshot below for the link: Chris also has talks from A. Richard Miller and Walter Bender posted; keep checking in with his website for more as he posts them!

Fedora Design Bounty: Installer Ransom Notes

Fedora Design Team Bounty
The Fedora Design Team Bounty is a type of blog post where we’ll outline a quick-and-easy design project that needs doing for the Fedora Community, outlining all the tools, files, and other resources you’ll need to complete the project. If you’re a designer and are interested in getting involved in the free and open source community, this is a good opportunity to get your feet wet!

Fedora Installer Ransom Notes

Today, when you install Fedora, you have to wait between 5-45 minutes (depending if you’re using live media or the full installer, and how many apps you select) for the install process to finish. While you wait, this is what the installer screen looks like:
Install Progress Screen in Fedora 15

Newly-expanded Fedora Logo Guidelines

Due in major part to Ian Weller’s extensive work on expanding Fedora’s logo usage guidelines, we now have updated logo usage guidelines that cover the usage of the Fedora logo in more detail, including: Coverage of the Fedora application and group sublogos. Coverage of the Fedora Remix logos. Coverage of the Fedora Foundations logos. Downloadable GPL-format palette file of an expanded color palette. Expanded and illustrated explanation of clear space guidelines throughout the document. Updated and expanded font usage guidelines. Overall more explanations, rationale, and other instructions on using the logos. Previews of the new guidelines Application and Group sub-logos

How to create graphics for a Fedora spin

I’ve been spending some time lately putting together some how-to documentation for various tasks the Fedora design team does on a regular basis.
This is a how-to on how to create graphics for a Fedora spin. During a recent design ticket review we noticed a few requests for spin graphics, and there seemed to be some confusion on how to create them. Hopefully this guide helps.

Overview

There’s three main graphics you’ll need to create a page for your spin at spins.fedoraproject.org. What you’ll need before you start creating these graphics:

Things you need to get from the spin maintainer

  • The abbreviated version of the spin’s name. This should be used in the name of the graphics files for your spin. For example, the ‘Fedora Electronic Lab’ has an abbreviated name of ‘Electronic-lab’, so:
    • It is listed as ‘Electronic-Lab’ in the spins directory on the front page of http://spins.fedoraproject.org
    • Its mini graphic is named: electronic-lab-mini.png
    • Its feature graphic is named: electronic-lab-feature.png
    • Its tagline graphic is named: electronic-lab-tagline.png
  • A tagline for the spin. Here’s some examples from current spins (shorter is better!):
    • KDE: “Be free.”
    • LXDE: “Your desktop, light as air.”
    • ‘FCE: “Speed up your desktop.”
    • Electronic Lab: “An advanced electronic design and simulation platform for micro-nano electronics engineering.”
    • Design Suite: “Open creativity.”

Making Fedora easier to use & the Installer UX redesign


(Inkscape SVGZ source)
If you want people to try Fedora so they can use it and so they can eventually become a FLOSS contributor, they need to be able to find and download it in the first place. The Fedora websites team and design team, with the website redesign project, hopefully made it easier for our user base to find the right download and to obtain it via our website.
Helping our user base access the installation media isn’t enough, though. They have to be able to make it through the installer to the other side! Those gaps in the diagram – each of those is a bail-out point. If they can’t make it easily through the installer, a member of our user base may well give up on Fedora.