I just wanted a piece of toast…

… and this popped out of my toaster. What the hey? The above uses the stock image “White Bread Slice on Black” by D. Sharon Pruitt, used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license. Want your own miraculous toast? Install the Gimp. (yum install gimp -y) Grab some bread. Grab the special edition black & white beef. Open up your bread in Gimp. Go to File > Open as Layer and grab black & white beefy. Make sure his layer is on top of the bread. In the Gimp ‘Layers’ palette, set Beefy’s blending mode to ‘burn.’ Adjust the opacity to your toast darkness preferences. Whoah, Beefy’s got a nice tan there, but the rest of the bread is pale white! Add a new layer, fill it in with a light grey, and set it to the ‘burn’ layer blending mode to even out the toast level a bit more. To give Beefy a more natural toasty texture, run Filters > Generic > Dilate on him once or twice to your taste. (Optional) Select ‘new layer from visible’ by right-clicking the layers dialog, and hide the layers underneath. Create a layer mask and mask out the toast so you’ll have …

Fourth Fedora Design Bounty Ninja identified!

The Fedora Design Team Bounty is a type of blog post where we’ll outline a quick-and-easy design project that needs doing for the Fedora Community, outlining all the tools, files, and other resources you’ll need to complete the project. If you’re a designer and are interested in getting involved in the free and open source community, this is a good opportunity to get your feet wet! I am quite happy to report that we have identified our third Fedora Design Bounty Ninja: Chris Beiser!! Chris responded to our fourth Fedora Design Bi-Weekly Bounty – coming up with concepts for Fedora installation ransom notes. Chris put together 10 concept sketches for installer ransom notes, including a very cool one involving an elf. 🙂 Congratulations, Chris, on a fantastic and creative set of ideas for the installer! Chris and I are going to work on iterating these designs and will include the best ones in Fedora 17’s redesigned installer. Are you ready for your chance to become an open source design ninja too? Keep an eye out for the next Fedora Design Bounty!

Rough mountpoint mapping & cool x220 setup

Some scribbles from a discussion in #anaconda with dlehman where we pondered over the overall flow / navigation of the advanced partitioning screen mockups in Fedora’s installer after showing them to Spot and lmacken and uncovering some issues. Will this go anywhere? No idea. We’re working it. What might be more interesting to you at this point is how it was drawn. I have a Lenovo x220 tablet in the ultrabase 3 docking station there with an external Dell monitor, keyboard, and mouse hooked up. I spun the tablet screen into full-on tablet mode while it was in the dock. Then I used the following magical incantations to adjust the screen and tablet rotation (otherwise I’d be scribblin’ on the tablet upside-down): xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Pen stylus” MapToOutput LVDS1 xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Finger touch” MapToOutput LVDS1 xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Pen eraser” MapToOutput LVDS1 The above maps the Wacom tablet to the laptop screen, so the tablet doesn’t try to span both the external monitor AND the tablet screen. xrandr –output LVDS1 –rotate inverted The command above spin the screen 180 degrees so it’s facing the right way. xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Pen stylus” …

Rough mountpoint mapping & cool x220 setup

Some scribbles from a discussion in #anaconda with dlehman where we pondered over the overall flow / navigation of the advanced partitioning screen mockups in Fedora’s installer after showing them to Spot and lmacken and uncovering some issues. Will this go anywhere? No idea. We’re working it. What might be more interesting to you at this point is how it was drawn. I have a Lenovo x220 tablet in the ultrabase 3 docking station there with an external Dell monitor, keyboard, and mouse hooked up. I spun the tablet screen into full-on tablet mode while it was in the dock. Then I used the following magical incantations to adjust the screen and tablet rotation (otherwise I’d be scribblin’ on the tablet upside-down): xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Pen stylus” MapToOutput LVDS1 xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Finger touch” MapToOutput LVDS1 xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Pen eraser” MapToOutput LVDS1 The above maps the Wacom tablet to the laptop screen, so the tablet doesn’t try to span both the external monitor AND the tablet screen. xrandr –output LVDS1 –rotate inverted The command above spin the screen 180 degrees so it’s facing the right way. xsetwacom set “Wacom ISDv4 E6 Pen stylus” …

More source (specifically patch) view in Fedora Packages

So I posted some quick & dirty mockups of a patch view web interface for Fedora packages, and you gave me some great ideas, and here are most of them integrated into the mockups. Full screen, Sources > Patches tab in a package profile Here you can see one of the three patches that apply to this package expanded into view. Some changes to this screen: There is now a ‘show summary of patch changes’ link that will provide diffstat information for all patches against the upstream tarball. There’s now a ‘show changelog’ link that will drop down the changelog entries relevant to the selected patch. Collapsed / default patch view Before you click on a patch to view it, the list of patches looks like this. Release selection dropdown You can view the patch history for the package across active releases or just for a specific release. Raw patch link Click to get a clean link to the full raw patch. Changelog view Click on the “show changelog” link at the top of an open patch and you’ll get this display, hopefully with clickable links to bug references (seems we have a little inconsistency though; I noted the formats …

Source view in Fedora Packages

Note: There’s a newer blog post here with more mockups and features based on your feedback in this post! Okay, quick recap. We’re working on a v2 of Fedora Community called “Fedora Packages.” The usual long-winded Mo blog post about it is available if you’d like to catch up. Now that you’ve been caught up, here’s a little something I mocked up today: And its friend, a version of it showing what happens if you click on the release / version number: (Oh dear, I hope I’m not getting overly fond of accordian-style widgets; we’ve been using them in the Fedora installer redesign as well.) Anyway, the story here is that you’ve searched for a package and want to poke into its sources. These screens show what you’ll see under the Sources > Patches tab… you’ll see a list of patch names and if you click on one, it’ll expand accordian style to show you the patch in its full glory. Along the bottom of the patch is a toolbar you can use to paste the patch to fpaste, email it, or grab a link to it to send to someone else. Are these useful things you might want to …

Slicing and dicing disks (first draft)

So, last time we chatted about Fedora’s installer redesign, we walked through how users would select which disks they’d like to be part of the install. Once our intrepid installer users have selected disks to install to, they should be set and the install will just work. (Okay, there’s the case where they have to squeeze space out of existing filesystems owned by another OS, and that’s in the plan, but not for this blog post.) In either case, these folks will not have to encounter screens like these at all. Some users, though, prefer to review and/or manually modify the disk partitioning, so this set of screens is what those users opt-in to see. So, most users simply trying to install Fedora on their laptop won’t ever have to bother with these screens unless they really want to. The way it’s mocked up now, they are tabs across a single screen. Serving up partitioning buffet-style like this is not ideal in my opinion, because then we’ll be enabling users to do things like btrfs raid on top of md raid which can, if I understand correctly, eliminate some of the advantages of having RAID in the first place. Buffet-style …