Reclaiming space from partitions during installation Round 2

So with some great feedback and great suggestions from you, I’ve been iterating more on the partition resize screen for Anaconda. I started out by poking around with the visual design of the drag handles, and Robin had the idea to make the space between partitions draggable and to use a model where you only drag between two partitions at a time. I think it will make more sense to do it that way, at least in this iteration. Initially I wanted there to be a free bucket on the right side that would grow as you shrank the partitions, but I think that makes it a little confusing as to how you would re-grow that partition if you changed your mind. Non-intuitive in the manner that the affect of your dragging can be displaced by more than just the next box over and it might not be immediately apparent to you that you can grow your partition even though it isn’t immediately adjacent to a block of free space. Smooge had the idea that there should be a clear indicator of how much you can squeeze down a given partition, so now the partitions have a lightly-colored graph to …

Drag / resize handles

In my last post about Anaconda’s UX redesign, there were a couple of mockups that featured draggable diagrams for managing space on a disk, allowing you to shrink its partitions as possible: I’ve been thinking about the best way to make the partitions look draggable. They only need to be draggable horizontally; the mockup above shows a diagonal drag handle making it seem as if the space could potentially be dragged upwards as well as horizontally (it can’t.) I’ve looked around different UI patterns for this; it seems a lot rely on the mouse hovering over the area to be dragged and the pointer changing to indicate draggability. I’m not sure that’s enough; I think there should be more visual clues that something is draggable that don’t require you to mouse over them to determine draggability. So here are some mockups I did just experimenting with different looks; some are definitely more successful than others, I think. What do you think?

Rough thoughts on reclaiming space from partitions during installation

So there’s a path in the storage flow of the Fedora installer redesign where if you don’t have enough free disk space to complete an install right now, but you have enough latent space available in your partitions if you were to shrink them. We offer to let you shrink them to continue the install in this situation. (This is highlighted in yellow in the flow chart above.) A partition should be considered shrinkable if it has at least one 500 MB+ of contiguous space within a shrinkable partition (not HFS journaled, not VFAT, not EFI, etc. etc.). Here’s the screen you get should you end up in that situation: So we’ve been talking about what happens when you click on that ‘Reclaim space’ button. Tree list approach First I took a tree list approach. While I hate tree lists, my brain was hurting around the concept that the general ‘list of parent items on the left, click on one, and details about its children are present on the right’ pattern that I find everywhere in the GNOME UI is typically only used for viewing details and not acting on them. There are some cases where you can act on …

GTK3 UI Template for Inkscape

Suchakra asked me today if I had a GTK3 template for doing UI mockups in Inkscape, and I realized even though I had put one together some months ago, I never posted it. So here it is, enjoy (if you need a license, let’s say it is GPL+, attribute the GNOME project; the icons are GPL+): GTK3 UI Template for Inkscape (SVG.GZ Inkscape file) Architect’s Daughter font (used in the template, OFL licensed)

16 More Brainstorm Ideas For Mailman's Web Interface

I went to the Shut Up and Draw session at SXSW yesterday. On the plane ride home last night, I decided to shut up and draw some mailman ideas. Well, I have 16 more… the first sixteen were about as many I thought reasonable for one post. So here’s the rest. These are just thumbnail sketches meant to express some ideas visually than serve as a guide for visual layout or any kind of formal mock up. I would love to know what you think about any of them. For each: Does it seem like a useful feature? Would you use it? Does it remind you of anything you’ve used before? Can you think of a better way to visualize the idea? Does it not belong in a mailman webui? How do you think it would shape conversation on a list? #17 List Monthly Health It might be cool for moderators to be able to have a monthly ‘bill of health’ for their list. What’s the population like, and how has it changed? Were there more or less posts than usual? How much spam did we get? What’s the male-to-female ratio? Out of all the members, how many are actually …

16 Brainstorm Ideas For Mailman's Web Interface

I went to the Shut Up and Draw session at SXSW yesterday. On the plane ride home last night, I decided to shut up and draw some mailman ideas. These are just thumbnail sketches meant to express some ideas visually than serve as a guide for visual layout or any kind of formal mock up. I would love to know what you think about any of them. For each: Does it seem like a useful feature? Would you use it? Does it remind you of anything you’ve used before? Can you think of a better way to visualize the idea? Does it not belong in a mailman webui? How do you think it would shape conversation on a list? #1 Promoting Good Posts The idea here is that someone’s made a brilliant post to a mailing list (it happens!) and you’d like to promote it to a more visible format: maybe press a button and it’ll bring you to a page with a form pre-filled with the message content so you can edit it down into a wiki page. Or maybe it could promote it to a blog post or something (you might have to hook up a wordpress blog …

The Potion for Motion: Interactive Interfaces / Apps (SXSW)

Hello there! I’m at SXSW (South By Southwest) 2012 this weekend, going to the interactive conference. Anyway, I tend to take copious notes when I go to talks. I thought they might be useful to a wider audience, so here you go. You can see other SXSW 2012 posts that I’ve made as well. The Potion for Motion: Interactive Interfaces / Apps Dan Simpkins – CEO of Hillcrest Labs SXSW Schedule Entry / Synopsis 2005, Hillcrest developed ‘Home’, the first TV interface for motion. Innovation is a good thing, but it can create confusion. Products that benefit from motion: smart tvs mobile devices game consoles set top boxes pc peripherals Motion sensors are becoming more commonplace. Every smartphone has an accelerometer, for example. Marketing has caused some confusion, so I’ll clear it up. What is motion? (Shows a photo of a man pointing.) Nautral motion, gesture, control knobs, pointing An equal number of you said this is a gesture, and an equal number said it is pointing. This is a key misperception. Motion is more than gestures. (Shows a photo of a woman running.) Not a gesture. Natural motion. (Shows Spock’s ‘V’ gesture.) A gesture. Motion is more than gesture. …

SXSW 2012: Design from the Gut: Dangerous or Differentiator?

Hello there! I’m at SXSW (South By Southwest) 2012 this weekend, going to the interactive conference. I’m also on a panel called Binary Bitches: Keeping Open Source Open to Women with RIT professor Andrea Hickerson and RIT design thinking lecturer Xanthe Matychak. If you are at SXSW and interested in free / open source software, you should drop by and say hi. 🙂 It’s tomorrow at 5. Anyway, I tend to take copious notes when I go to talks. I thought they might be useful to a wider audience, so here you go. Design from the Gut: Dangerous or Differentiator? Session Description: (From the SXSW 2012 schedule) The internet is a never-ending data source. Through it we are able to monitor visitor activity, study traffic patterns, and use these analytics to help guide users in the directions we want. Usability testing gives us behavioral information which can either affirm design decisions or inform necessary changes. Research and analytics go a long way in selling a creative direction to clients who are focused on engaging with their customers and in how marketing dollars will impact their bottom line. But what about a designer’s instinct—that moment when a designer just knows what …

7,750 pixels of mailing list thread

Short Run by J.D. Hancock on Flickr (Used under a CC-BY 2.0 license.) The Background Story I come from a background strongly focused on communication; my Human-Computer Interaction masters’ degree was out of RPI’s Language, Literature, and Communication Department and my coursework was built on language, literature, and communication as a foundation to understanding newer digital communication methods. I may be biased, then, in thinking a lot of the angst (E.g., It’s Scary to Join an Open Source Project, Customer Support, The Simon Cowell Way, Channels for Community Communications) around getting things done in free software is coming to a crescendo because our tools for basic communication are not serving us well as we scale larger, and fixing that problem has massive potential to better the free software community. Two years ago now (*sob*!) Luke Macken and I came up with some ideas for a web-based mailing list interface that would complement (not replace) mailing lists as they are today. We’re both pretty busy though and have had a ton of projects we needed to work on for our jobs, so neither of us have really done much with it since then. However, the post is one of the most …

What's your partitioning persona? And, the partitioning UI thus far.

Partitioning personas Redesigning the UI for something as complex as an OS installer has the potential to be disruptive to some classes of users, so in designing and re-designing and re-re-designing the partitioning screens for Fedora’s installer, we’d like to make sure you’re going to be covered. Do any of these cases describe you, and if not, can you let me know how you use the partitioning functionality of Anaconda or really any OS installer so I can account for your use case? The partitioning UI thus far What are we doing to the installer’s partitioning UI to bring us to ask such questions? What is all this redesigning that’s going on? Well, let’s talk about partitioning as it works today in Anaconda. Note that this is a screenshot of Red Hat Linux 8.0 from 2002, almost 10 years ago now. Aside from the online help / release notes pane on the left which has long since been dropped, this partitioning screen does not look much different today. Our partitioning UI is currently very technology-centric. I suspect users care a lot more about the mountpoint layout of their OS with the technology underneath having a less primary role for them. …