Fedora package social networking

So we’ve been talking about a reincarnation of Fedora Community (the app). Stuff to take note of: Yes, it looks like Facebook. (As my coworker Partha likes to remind me, Fedora had the white lowercase f on blue first. 🙂 ) The main navbar for the package is directly under its name & summary. Additional information about the package is available via nav items along the right sidebar, but what we thought was the most important we put in the main navbar. What do you think about which is most important and which is not? In the main navbar we have: Bugs – this will be somewhat like the current bugs tab in Fedora Community. Contents – this will be like running rpm -ql on the package; it will list out all the files it includes. Changelog – a changelog of the package, similar to what Fedora Community has now. Sources – this will show patches we’ve applied if any, the spec file, the git repo for source, the tarball, maybe diffs. (SRPM should be available here too I think.) Relationships – requires / dependences / provides / obsoletes / etc. information. Maybe like this mockup, but less crappy. Also …

Anaconda Language & Keyboard Layout Selection

…If we went with this design, then, the language selection flow in Anaconda might look something like this:

A probably non-exhaustive list of how this would change Anaconda is as follows:

  • Folks who don’t speak English would be able to more easily pick out their language in the initial set of ~60 or so languages Anaconda supports since they’d be available in their native name.
  • You’d be able to install the OS in a language beyond the limited set that the Anaconda UI itself is available in.
  • You’d be able to choose between a preferred language with limited coverage or a less-preferred language with fuller coverage since limited coverage languages would be flagged.
  • You’d be able to use more than one keyboard layout, which was not possible before. Multi-lingual users would not have this extra step post-install.
  • The keyboard command for switching between keyboard layouts would be more visible, and you’d be able to switch between them in the installer itself (useful for an American with accent marks in her name. *cough*)
  • You’d be able to modify the keyboard command for switching between keyboard layouts, and not need to configure it post-install.
  • You’d be able to filter in both the keyboard layout and language lists.
  • You’d be able to take a selected keyboard layout for a test drive before committing to it.

Anaconda Language & Keyboard Layout Selection

…If we went with this design, then, the language selection flow in Anaconda might look something like this:

A probably non-exhaustive list of how this would change Anaconda is as follows:

  • Folks who don’t speak English would be able to more easily pick out their language in the initial set of ~60 or so languages Anaconda supports since they’d be available in their native name.
  • You’d be able to install the OS in a language beyond the limited set that the Anaconda UI itself is available in.
  • You’d be able to choose between a preferred language with limited coverage or a less-preferred language with fuller coverage since limited coverage languages would be flagged.
  • You’d be able to use more than one keyboard layout, which was not possible before. Multi-lingual users would not have this extra step post-install.
  • The keyboard command for switching between keyboard layouts would be more visible, and you’d be able to switch between them in the installer itself (useful for an American with accent marks in her name. *cough*)
  • You’d be able to modify the keyboard command for switching between keyboard layouts, and not need to configure it post-install.
  • You’d be able to filter in both the keyboard layout and language lists.
  • You’d be able to take a selected keyboard layout for a test drive before committing to it.

Delicious Inkscape mockup export script

Thanks to Ray’s bash scripting prowess and help, I am now in possession of a delicious script that makes exporting multiple PNGs from one master mockup Inkscape SVG file easy.
Further development might involve automagical wiki uploading, perhaps based on a wikipage name you input into the script..? 🙂 ?
I documented it pretty well so I it speaks for itself. I guess the only thing I’d add, is to give the frames in your Inkscape SVG an id, you need to right-click the object you’re using as a frame, and select ‘Object Properties’ for the menu. You don’t need to right-click and select the ‘Object Properties’ item for each and every frame—you may simply keep the ‘Object Properties’ dialog open and click on each frame object as you go.

Ideas for a cgroups UI

On and off over the past year I’ve been working with Jason Baron on a design for a UI for system administrators to control processes’ and users’ usage of system resources on their systems via the relatively recently-developed (~2007) cgroups feature of the Linux kernel. After the excitement and the fun that is the Red Hat Summit, I had some time this week to work with Jason on updating the design. Before I dive into the design process and the mockups, I think it’d be best to do a review of how cgroups work (or at least how I understand them to) so that the rest makes more sense. (And maybe I’ve got some totally incorrect assumptions about cgroups that have resulted in a flawed design, so hopefully my calling out the current understanding might make it easier for you to correct me 🙂 ). A designer’s understanding of cgroups via diagram So cgroups, which are sometimes referred to as containers (I think because a similar Solaris feature, zones, is sometimes called containers) can be used to slice an entire operating system into buckets, similarly to how virtual machines slice up their host system into buckets, but without having to …

REINITIALIZING WILL CAUSE ALL DATA TO BE LOST!

This post is just a little bit of thinking about a particular warning dialog in the Fedora installer. There is a ‘just for now,’ simple, low-churn solution to the issue, but the larger problem remains unsolved. I’ve also documented this saga in the Fedora wiki for posterity. It’s what I’ve been looking at over the past couple of days. The problem Background See the screenshot above? Scary little bugger, right? Yep, there’s a few issues with this screen. We’ve received bugs on it requesting that the text be changed to be more accurate. There’s bigger problems than that, though. Let’s go a bit into the background of this dialog. It occurs early on in the screen flow: [ lang selection ] => [ keyboard selection ] => [ basic or special storage ] => [ REINIT DIALOG ] => [ hostname selection ] Here’s the full order of things in the anaconda code. The screen that asks if you have basic or specialized storage must come towards the beginning of the screen set, because it is at this point anaconda has to scan to see if any pre-existing installations are on the system in order to know if we can …

Free Interaction Design for your FLOSS Project

Matt Jadud made a blog post yesterday offering up free interaction design for free & open source projects. Wait, wait. Let me repeat that and make it a little bigger, because in the brevity of that sentence you might have missed it’s sheer awesomeness: Matt Jadud is offering up free interaction design for free & open source projects. This is a great opportunity. Matt is a computer science professor at Allegheny College, and he’s teaching an interaction design course this coming semester (which starts next Thursday!) Matt is an alumni of the Teaching Open Source POSSE program (POSSE standards for “Professors’ Open Source Summer Experience”) and a writer for opensource.com, and he is passionate about getting students involved in free & open source software and improving the connections between FLOSS and academia. So when you read his blog post, where he’s offering up the students of his Fall 2010 interaction design class to help FLOSS projects, you can be assured he means business. So here’s what Matt is asking of you: You need to be a developer or manager directly involved with the project you’re submitting for interaction design help. While I am sure we all have our pet bugs …

Contributing to free & open source software as a designer

Next Sunday there’s going to be a FLOSS HCI Workshop at CHI 2010 in Atlanta, GA. CHI is the annual conference on human-computer interaction’ [1] for ACM’s SIG CHI (Special Interest Group in Computer-Human Interaction.) Michael Terry from the University of Waterloo and Paula Bach from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have organized this workshop for both folks in the academic HCI community and HCI folks from the open source community. It’s going to be an opportunity for folks from either or both groups to get together and to share knowledge and propose directions for research both to help inform HCI tools and to further the user experience in free/libre and open source software. My submission for the workshop was a 12-page case study [2] from my own experiences of being a designer in the Fedora community, on the Fedora Design Team. I wanted to post this before the workshop to get your feedback on it so I can bring it up during the workshop when I attend it next week! Let me know if there’s anything in there that’s wrong, anything that might have been forgotten, or honestly any other points at all you would like to see …

Contributing to free & open source software as a designer

Next Sunday there’s going to be a FLOSS HCI Workshop at CHI 2010 in Atlanta, GA. CHI is the annual conference on human-computer interaction’ [1] for ACM’s SIG CHI (Special Interest Group in Computer-Human Interaction.) Michael Terry from the University of Waterloo and Paula Bach from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have organized this workshop for both folks in the academic HCI community and HCI folks from the open source community. It’s going to be an opportunity for folks from either or both groups to get together and to share knowledge and propose directions for research both to help inform HCI tools and to further the user experience in free/libre and open source software. My submission for the workshop was a 12-page case study [2] from my own experiences of being a designer in the Fedora community, on the Fedora Design Team. I wanted to post this before the workshop to get your feedback on it so I can bring it up during the workshop when I attend it next week! Let me know if there’s anything in there that’s wrong, anything that might have been forgotten, or honestly any other points at all you would like to see …