Anaconda Language & Keyboard Layout Selection

…If we went with this design, then, the language selection flow in Anaconda might look something like this:

A probably non-exhaustive list of how this would change Anaconda is as follows:

  • Folks who don’t speak English would be able to more easily pick out their language in the initial set of ~60 or so languages Anaconda supports since they’d be available in their native name.
  • You’d be able to install the OS in a language beyond the limited set that the Anaconda UI itself is available in.
  • You’d be able to choose between a preferred language with limited coverage or a less-preferred language with fuller coverage since limited coverage languages would be flagged.
  • You’d be able to use more than one keyboard layout, which was not possible before. Multi-lingual users would not have this extra step post-install.
  • The keyboard command for switching between keyboard layouts would be more visible, and you’d be able to switch between them in the installer itself (useful for an American with accent marks in her name. *cough*)
  • You’d be able to modify the keyboard command for switching between keyboard layouts, and not need to configure it post-install.
  • You’d be able to filter in both the keyboard layout and language lists.
  • You’d be able to take a selected keyboard layout for a test drive before committing to it.

Making Fedora easier to use & the Installer UX redesign


(Inkscape SVGZ source)
If you want people to try Fedora so they can use it and so they can eventually become a FLOSS contributor, they need to be able to find and download it in the first place. The Fedora websites team and design team, with the website redesign project, hopefully made it easier for our user base to find the right download and to obtain it via our website.
Helping our user base access the installation media isn’t enough, though. They have to be able to make it through the installer to the other side! Those gaps in the diagram – each of those is a bail-out point. If they can’t make it easily through the installer, a member of our user base may well give up on Fedora.

Making Fedora easier to use & the Installer UX redesign


(Inkscape SVGZ source)
If you want people to try Fedora so they can use it and so they can eventually become a FLOSS contributor, they need to be able to find and download it in the first place. The Fedora websites team and design team, with the website redesign project, hopefully made it easier for our user base to find the right download and to obtain it via our website.
Helping our user base access the installation media isn’t enough, though. They have to be able to make it through the installer to the other side! Those gaps in the diagram – each of those is a bail-out point. If they can’t make it easily through the installer, a member of our user base may well give up on Fedora.

REINITIALIZING WILL CAUSE ALL DATA TO BE LOST!

This post is just a little bit of thinking about a particular warning dialog in the Fedora installer. There is a ‘just for now,’ simple, low-churn solution to the issue, but the larger problem remains unsolved. I’ve also documented this saga in the Fedora wiki for posterity. It’s what I’ve been looking at over the past couple of days. The problem Background See the screenshot above? Scary little bugger, right? Yep, there’s a few issues with this screen. We’ve received bugs on it requesting that the text be changed to be more accurate. There’s bigger problems than that, though. Let’s go a bit into the background of this dialog. It occurs early on in the screen flow: [ lang selection ] => [ keyboard selection ] => [ basic or special storage ] => [ REINIT DIALOG ] => [ hostname selection ] Here’s the full order of things in the anaconda code. The screen that asks if you have basic or specialized storage must come towards the beginning of the screen set, because it is at this point anaconda has to scan to see if any pre-existing installations are on the system in order to know if we can …

Anaconda & Advanced Storage Devices

At FUDcon Berlin I started working on mockups to improve Anaconda’s UI with respect to advanced storage devices. E.g., fibre channel, iSCSI, multipath storage devices, etc. etc. etc. – storage devices beyond simple hard drives in your laptop or in your desktop system case. Right now there are a few concerns for working with these devices in Anaconda: It can be a little difficult to identify these devices. Depending on the interconnect and depending on what information the administrators of the storage devices provide you with, different types of information are useful and some are not. For example, the vendor’s name of a RAID BIOS array may not be all that useful since multiple types of hard drives may be part of the array, but whether or not a SAN is EMC or QLogic may actually be a useful distinguishing characteristic. These types of devices, if there are enough of them on the network, can take too long to load into the UI. It can be a little bit scary to be certain of which drives are merely being mounted post-install and which are getting formatted as part of the install. The Anaconda UI redesign mockup work is still in …