Package categories… what do you think?

More on the Fedora Packages web application project here… 🙂 The problem So one thing that might stand out to you in the package profile mockup for Fedora Packages, above, is that the package has a big, beautiful vector icon from the GNOME icon project. Sadly, we do not have big, beautiful icons for most of our packages. (If you’re an icon designer and would like to help, though, you’ll want to join the icon project and pop into #gnome-art on irc.gimp.net to get started!) So we need to figure out what to display there so folks can visually, at a glance, get an idea of what package it is that they’re looking at. Later on, that icon area could be used for a collaborate screenshot gallery, for example, where folks can upload their screenshots or logo artwork for a given package. For now, though, let’s try to get a nice icon display first! A proposal So Luke, J5, Spot, and I came up with a scheme to handle icon display for the many scenarios in which a package does not have an icon, or has a small icon. One idea we had was to have a set of fallbacks; …

More source (specifically patch) view in Fedora Packages

So I posted some quick & dirty mockups of a patch view web interface for Fedora packages, and you gave me some great ideas, and here are most of them integrated into the mockups. Full screen, Sources > Patches tab in a package profile Here you can see one of the three patches that apply to this package expanded into view. Some changes to this screen: There is now a ‘show summary of patch changes’ link that will provide diffstat information for all patches against the upstream tarball. There’s now a ‘show changelog’ link that will drop down the changelog entries relevant to the selected patch. Collapsed / default patch view Before you click on a patch to view it, the list of patches looks like this. Release selection dropdown You can view the patch history for the package across active releases or just for a specific release. Raw patch link Click to get a clean link to the full raw patch. Changelog view Click on the “show changelog” link at the top of an open patch and you’ll get this display, hopefully with clickable links to bug references (seems we have a little inconsistency though; I noted the formats …

Source view in Fedora Packages

Note: There’s a newer blog post here with more mockups and features based on your feedback in this post! Okay, quick recap. We’re working on a v2 of Fedora Community called “Fedora Packages.” The usual long-winded Mo blog post about it is available if you’d like to catch up. Now that you’ve been caught up, here’s a little something I mocked up today: And its friend, a version of it showing what happens if you click on the release / version number: (Oh dear, I hope I’m not getting overly fond of accordian-style widgets; we’ve been using them in the Fedora installer redesign as well.) Anyway, the story here is that you’ve searched for a package and want to poke into its sources. These screens show what you’ll see under the Sources > Patches tab… you’ll see a list of patch names and if you click on one, it’ll expand accordian style to show you the patch in its full glory. Along the bottom of the patch is a toolbar you can use to paste the patch to fpaste, email it, or grab a link to it to send to someone else. Are these useful things you might want to …

Fedora package social networking

So we’ve been talking about a reincarnation of Fedora Community (the app). Stuff to take note of: Yes, it looks like Facebook. (As my coworker Partha likes to remind me, Fedora had the white lowercase f on blue first. 🙂 ) The main navbar for the package is directly under its name & summary. Additional information about the package is available via nav items along the right sidebar, but what we thought was the most important we put in the main navbar. What do you think about which is most important and which is not? In the main navbar we have: Bugs – this will be somewhat like the current bugs tab in Fedora Community. Contents – this will be like running rpm -ql on the package; it will list out all the files it includes. Changelog – a changelog of the package, similar to what Fedora Community has now. Sources – this will show patches we’ve applied if any, the spec file, the git repo for source, the tarball, maybe diffs. (SRPM should be available here too I think.) Relationships – requires / dependences / provides / obsoletes / etc. information. Maybe like this mockup, but less crappy. Also …