Design Hub Update

So progress is happening on Design Hub! Robby from Isotope 11 continues to work on the prototype, Colin Zwiebel has been working on setting up infrastructure, and I’ve been hacking on the CSS in any spare time I can scrounge up. (What’s Design Hub? It’s one of the ideas we talked about at the GNOME UX Hackfest in London last month as a way for us designers to collaborate better! Read more about it in my initial blog post about it, at the GNOME Hackfest writeup about it, and at a follow-up mockup post about it.) I’ve spent the past couple evenings changing the CSS I had started on to use 960.gs, which Ian Weller had pointed out to me some time ago. I’ve actually been using the Inkscape templates that the 960.gs project has made available for some time since then (for example, the www.fedoraproject.org redesign mockups were made using the 960.gs Inkscape templates.) I never made the leap to actually use the 960.gs CSS itself until now, though, and I’m happy to report that it’s a breeze. Here’s a screenshot of how far I got tonight before deciding to work on this status report on the project; my …

Another Design Hub mockup

I worked on another mockup for the mockup collaboration tool I blogged about a while back – Josh from Isotope11 coined the name ‘Design Hub’ and I like it, so that’s what I’m calling it now. 🙂 I put this together for Robby from Isotope11, who has been rocking out on implementing a prototype of the application. (I saw a preliminary prototype last week and was really impressed with the progress! I’m hoping to carve out some time to CSS-ify it soon.) Josh has been doing a great job making sure the project keeps moving forward also, so I’m pretty pumped. (I have the usual post-hackfest ‘shiny-ponies-flying-in-the-air-oh-I-want-them-all’ distractability lately so Josh’s patience & focus has been very helpful.) Here’s the other screens that need to be mocked up: Mockup #1: the first mockup, the details page for a single proposal Mockup #2: The same as the project details mockup shown here, but in the mode where the project has been finished and the proposal that ended up getting used is highlighted. Mockup #3: A listing of all the projects going on right now. Maybe link to an archive of old ones. Each project should have a little preview of the …

The one where the designers ask for a pony

One of the topics Garrett made sure to bring up at the GNOME London UX Hackfest was how us designers could continue to collaborate after the hackfest was over. This has been a recurring issue, as us designers meet every year or so, at GUADEC, at UX hackfests, or at GNOME Boston Summits (or even other FLOSS events like LinuxTag) and we get some great collaborate work done during the events – but it peters off after we get settled in back home after the events. On Friday morning Hylke, Garrett, jimmac, and myself had a discussion with the developers in the room to explain the kinds of FLOSS tools we felt we’d need to be able to collaborate on designs more effectively when we’re remote from each other. This broke down into two main sets of needs: Challenge A: Designer <=> Designer collaboration tools Jimmac, Garrett, and Hylke have been using DropBox as a method of sharing design work (SVGs, PNGs for icons and UI mockups) for a whlie now. It’s been a quite effective tool for them to use, but as they pointed out, it is not open source and they would prefer to use a FLOSS tool. …

Random idea for design collaboration tool

This might be nothing, it might be something. I’ve been getting rather fed up with mailing lists as the primary tool for organizing the Fedora release artwork process lately. Just for fun tonight I did a mockup of one page of the kind of web application I’d like to use to manage the process instead. Inkscape source – please feel free to download and work it. Maybe this goes nowhere (except to prove I really ought to find something better to do with my Friday nights…. 🙂 )