Some www.fpo header mockups

I worked through these fedoraproject.org redesign header mockups today with Sijis’ feedback. I’m really liking the last one, #7. 🙂 Sometimes you just have to keep trying, keep experimenting, until you discover something that works. The problem we were trying to solve here was having two competing navigation bars, and placing the navbar in such a manner that I felt it wouldn’t necessitate an awkward non-front page layout. In #6 and #7 you can see the two navbars have been collapsed into one, and it’s above the main banner / slideshow area. Sijis suggested moving it above the banner and I think it works really well. The problem with it on the bottom is that if you have a subpage that doesn’t have a banner, it makes the nav bar move up and down the page making it much more complicated to move between pages via that navbar (when the navbar itself jumps around the page you have to refind your place on the page to click on a nav item.) Anyway, I hope these are at least nice eye candy, if not a more interesting study of how to solve a design problem through iteration. 🙂 #1 #2 #3 …

fedoraproject.org front page redesign mockup #1

So as part of the ongoing www.fedoraproject.org website redesign project, I’ve been working on mockups for a new www.fedoraproject.org front page. Here’s the rough sitemap I’ve drawn up for the work: As you can see, a lot of thought has been put into the home page and articles features on it (sections 1-5). I haven’t had much opportunity to flesh out the Get Help and Join Fedora sections yet, although I know Diana Harrelson’s anthropological study of the Fedora community is chock-full of useful data and recommendations, especially for the Join Fedora section. If you have any ideas or suggestions for either Join Fedora or Get Help please let me know, since we’re still in the process of fleshing out those sections. Now, before I type out those img tags for the mockups themselves, a few caveats: These are very rough mockups. I’ve been working out the navigation scheme with Sijis – I’m not happy with it right now so he’s been helping me figure out a better way – so it will probably change. So yeah, we know it kind of sucks, we’re working on it. 🙂 The position of individual elements on the screens will probably change. The …

Unpackaged Open Font: Comfortaa

Comfortaa is a sans-serif typeface created by Johan Aakerlund, a young and very talented, self-taught font designer from Denmark who has been creating fonts for around 2 years now. I asked Johan what inspired him to create Comfortaa, and he responded, “What really got me interested in fonts in the first place was actually a documentary on Helvetica that i watched. At that time my favorite font was Century Gothic, but I wanted a softer (and plainly different) alternative, but with some of the same qualities as Century Gothic. So after searching a while without finding one I decided to try and design it myself.” He has named it Comfortaa because of his goal of making it ‘comfortable.’ Johan recently changed Comfortaa’s license such that it is now licensed under the Open Font License. Comfortaa is a great font feature-wise, because it features three weights: Comfortaa’s coverage is also great. Fedora’s design team has been running a trial of Comfortaa to see if it’d be a suitable headline font for Fedora, and we’ve found it has much better glyph coverage in our languages than our current headline font, MgOpen Modata. One big win, for example, is Comfortaa’s Cyrillic support (it …

Second Fedora Design Bounty Ninja identified!

I am quite happy to report that we have identified our second Fedora Design Bounty Ninja: Emily Dirsh!! Emily responded to our second Fedora Design Bi-Weekly Bounty – a slide template project – shortly after introducing herself on the Design Team’s mailing list. Emily put together a new default slide template for Fedora presentations, using Inkscape to create her mockups, and building the final template for OpenOffice.org Impress. She came up with a very nice texture for the background based on Fedora logo elements, and carefully adhered to all of the Fedora branding guidelines. She also provided all of her source work! Congratulations, Emily, on a job well-done! Emily has already started regularly attending the Fedora Design Team meetings and has provided very useful suggestions during these meetings, including some great feedback on Fedora websites redesign project, so we’re definitely looking forward to work with her more! Ninja Supply Kit Both Emily and Jef have ninja supply kits on the way to help thank them for their Fedora Design Bounty work. Are you ready for your chance to become an open source design ninja too? Keep an eye out for the next Fedora Design Bounty!

get.fedoraproject.org redesign post-mortem

On Post-Mortems “Post-mortem!” you exclaim, “how ghoulish!” Well, yeah. The term is usually used for meetings and discussions about how well a software release went after it’s out the door, at least on som of the teams I’ve worked on (greets to my tacos!) So, anyway, here is a post-mortem examination of the new http://get.fedoraproject.org design. A little background on the Fedora website design So I’ve already given you the story behind why we decided to re-do the get.fedoraproject.org pages on fedoraproject.org. The get.fedoraproject.org redesign work was completed as part of Phase 2 and was released with Fedora 13 this past May. If you’re curious as to the why and how we got here, you can read up on it on another blog post. Run-down of the redesign The design is documented on the get.fpo design wiki page and was also shared several months before release on this blog. As mentioned in the history of this project, we decided to split get.fedoraproject.org out into two main sections: The first section, presented by default, would be aimed at fulfilling the Board’s requirements – a single simple download button prominently placed, a promo for spins.fedoraproject.org, and clear links to support & help. …

Fedora websites design status

While the Fedora Design team and Fedora Websites team along with the Fedora Board have been working towards a completely updated web presence for Fedora over the past couple of releases, I wanted to give a bit of a summary of what’s happened so far, provide you a bit of an update on our current status, and give you another avenue for providing feedback as well as solicit yet more feedback from you. 🙂 A little background on Fedora website design A long time ago, but not so long ago, http://fedoraproject.org was a simple splash page with just a bunch of links. Later on, it redirected straight to the wiki. After a release or two bringing the entire wiki down (and halting contributors from getting work done!) because of high-demand on the website for downloading releases, a very simple, lightweight set of static pages was put together to help alleviate the problem. It is the base of that lightweight static page set that we have been using for quite some time these days. After the initial launch of Fedora Community and its freshened-up template with the release of Fedora 11, the Fedora Project homepage appeared in severe need of some …

fedoracommunity.org Website Design

The vision for fedoracommunity.org Fedora has a lot of local community websites. A somewhat recent addition to the mix is Fedora’s local community domain program, whereby a local Fedora community can obtain a *.fedoracommunity.org domain to point to their self-hosted website. In the midst of a thread on the advisory-board mailing list, it became clear that it would be a good thing to have a single place where folks seeking out their particular local Fedora community could go to find it, rather than searching in multiple places for their community. In the thread, a Fedora Infrastructure ticket to this end was also referenced. The work so far Matt Domsch created the barebones portal page for this directory that is up on fedoracommunity.org now, asking for assistance in making it a nicer-looking site. I posted an initial mockup for feedback in reply, and since then have iterated a few times based on the feedback I’ve gotten. I’ve been working with Sijis Aviles, who very quickly took my early mockups and produced a first cut at an HTML/CSS version of them. A few design decisions have been made throughout this process that you might want to be aware of: Both national flags …

Fedora Board Meeting, 16 July 2010

Last Meeting The Fedora Board did not meet last week – the meeting was cancelled due to the transition of leadership between Paul and Jared. Let me give you a quick update on the action items from last meeting: jds2001 to help skvidal with tech side of FAS account name displayed per planet user as needed. item complete mizmo will bring up some alternatives and additional solutions for the fedoracommunity.org portal on the advisory-board list. That thread is here, and work is on-going to develop a nice portal for fedoracommunity.org. I’ll be blogging about it here very soon. 🙂 mizmo talk to seth re FAS ids on planet and file infraticket if needed. Ticket filed, complete. Now mizmo needs to update the planet template to use the new FAS attribute. Log Links Minutes (html) Minutes (text) Log A New Meeting Format The board meeting today experimented with a different format than previous meetings. Rather than having a separate #fedora-board-questions channel, we allowed everyone voice in #fedora-board-meeting and had an open discussion. We started with Q&A upfront and then decided about halfway to make the entire meeting Q&A. The new format wasn’t perfect (a lot of different topics were interleaved with …

Talking about Inkscape, in Leeds UK, from Boston USA, via Empathy.

Last Thursday, at the invitation of Rob Martin from the North East Leeds City Learning Centre in Leeds UK, I gave a talk about the Inkscape class I worked on as part of a Red Hat outreach program earlier this year. The occasion was the National City Learning Centres Conference 2010, which very excitingly had an open source track.The National City Learning Centers are organizations that help the area schools around them make use of technological innovations: providing training programs and workshops and supporting and developing solutions for technology use in the schools. Our Inkscape class seemed quite appropriate a topic! Here’s the thing, though: The conference took place in Leeds, UK. I gave my talk from Boston, Massachusetts. Take that, Atlantic Ocean! After numerous failed yet valiant attempts with Skype (no video, only audio and screensharing worked), Rob and his colleague Paul Bellwood gave empathy a shot – and it worked! Now, let me give you some caveats here: The call dropped two times during my talk. While Paul was very quick to reconnect the call, it was a little disorienting. We’re not sure why it happened.Screen sharing would not work in empathy. Sometimes it would be greyed out …