Painless accessibility tips for GNOME designers and developers

This morning at the GNOME 3 UX Hackfest in London, Willie Walker gave us some tips for ‘painless’ accessibility. First he reviewed the three main types of access users need us to support: 1: Some people can’t use the keyboard These users use devices such as: head tracking eye tracking switch-based access (they press buttons on a switch – the accessibility layer translates these to keyboard stroke) For head-tracking and eye-tracking, they hover over an area to cause a click. Some of these users can’t use keyboard or mouse at all. They may use a button/switch to interact and translate to keyboard. You need to think about users who cannot use the keyboard at all. 2: Some people can’t use the mouse These users use devices such as: switch-based access (they press buttons on a switch use joystick instead of mouse A big category of users who cannot use the mouse are users who are completely blind. Since they cannot tell where on the screen the mouse is, they can’t use it. These users rely on keyboard access To make sure you’re accounting for these users, try unplugging your mouse and see if you can use your interface: Can you …