Bíonn gach tosach lag*

Tá mé ag foghlaim Gaeilge; tá uaim scríobh postálacha blag as Gaeilge, ach níl mé oilte ar labhairt nó scríbh as Gaeilge go fóill. Tiocfaidh sé le tuilleadh cleachtaidh.** Catching up I have definitely fallen off the blog wagon; as you may or may not know the past year has been quite difficult for me personally, far beyond being an American living in Biff Tannen’s timeline these days. Blogging definitely was pushed to the bottom of the formidable stack I must balance but in hindsight I think the practice of writing is beneficial matter what it’s about so I will carve regular time out to do it. Tá mé ag foghlaim Gaeilge This post title and opening is in Irish; I am learning Irish and trying to immerse myself as much as one can outside of a Gaeltacht. There’s quite a few reasons for this: The most acute trigger is that I have been doing some genealogy and encountered family records written in Irish. I couldn’t recall enough of the class I’d taken while in college and got pulled in wanting to brush up. Language learning is really fun, and Irish is of course part of my heritage and I …

A follow up on Fedora 28's background art

A quick post – I have a 4k higher-quality render of one of Fedora 28 background candidates mentioned in a recent post about the Fedora 28 background design process. Click on the image below to grab it if you would like to try / test it and hopefully give some feedback on it: One of the suggestions I’ve received from your feedback is to try to vary the height between the ‘f’ and the infinity symbol so they stand out. I’m hoping to find some time this week to figure out how exactly to do that (I’m a Blender newbie 😳), but if you want to try your hand, the Blender source file is available.

Fedora 28's Desktop Background Design

Fedora 28 (F28) is slated to release in May 2018. On the Fedora Design Team, we’ve been thinking about the default background wallpaper for F28 since November. Let’s walk through the Fedora 28 background process thus far as a sort of pre-mortem; we’d love your feedback on where we’ve ended up. November: Inspiration As of the past 3 releases, we choose a sequential letter of the alphabet and come up with a list of scientists / mathematicians / technologists to serve as an inspiration for the desktop background’s visual concept: Backgrounds from Fedora 25, 26, and 27. 25’s inspiration was Archimedes, and the visual concept was an organic Archimedes’ screw. F26’s inspiration was Alexander Graham Bell, and the visual concept was a sound wave of a voice saying “Fedora.” F27’s inspiration was underwater researcher Jacques Cousteau, and the inspiration was transparency in the form of jellyfish. Gnokii kicked off the process in November by starting the list of D scientists for F28 and holding a vote on the team: we chose Emily Duncan, an early technologist who invented several types of banking calculators. December: First concepts We had a meeting in IRC (which I seem to have forgotten to run …

Enabling New Contributors

I had a random idea today and wanted to share it in case anybody has thought about this too, or tried something like it, or could add on to the idea. How We Onboard Today I onboard, mentor, and think a lot about enabling new contributors to open source software. Traditionally in Fedora, we’ve called out a ‘join’ process for people to join Fedora. If you visit join.fedoraproject.org, you’ll get redirected to a wiki page that gives broad categories of skill sets and suggests Fedora teams you might want to look at to see if you could join them. I started thinking about this because I’m giving a keynote about open source and UX at Ohio Linux Fest this weekend. One of the sections of the talk basically reviews where / how to find UX designers to help open source projects. Some of the things I mention that have proven effective are internships (Outreachy, formal Red Hat intern program, etc.), training, and design bounties / job boards. Posting UX assistance on say join.fedoraproject.org? Didn’t come up. I can’t tell you if I’ve actually onboarded folks from that workflow – certainly possible. My best success ratio in onboarding contributors in terms …

Propose a talk for Flock!

Flock 2017’s CFP is open! We need your Flock session proposals! This year’s Flock is more action-oriented compared to previous Flocks. The majority of session slots are hackfests and workshops; only one day (Tuesday the 29th) is devoted to traditional talks. The registration system allows you to submit 4 different types of proposals: Talk (30 min) – A traditional talk, 30-minute time slot. Talk (60 min) – A traditional talk, 60-minute time slot. Do-Session (120 min) – A 2-hour long hackfest or workshop. Do-Session (120 min) – A 3-hour long hackfest or workshop. There is no session proposal limit. Feel free to submit as many proposals as you have ideas for. Our CFP ends June 15 so you have one week to get those awesome proposals in! Submit your Flock session proposal now! How to create a strong proposal How can you ensure your proposal is sufficiently strong enough for acceptance into Flock? Here are some tips and guidelines: Align your proposal to Fedora’s new mission statement. Fedora’s mission statement was updated almost two months ago. The revised and final mission statement is: Fedora creates an innovative platform for hardware, clouds, and containers that enables software developers and community members …

Flock Cod Registration Form Design

We’re prepping the regcfp site for Flock to open up registrations and CFP for Flock. As a number of changes are underfoot for this year’s Flock compared to previous Flocks, we’ve needed to change up the registration form accordingly. (For those interested, the discussion has been taking place on the flock-planning list). This is a second draft of those screens after the first round of feedback. The first screen is going to spoil the surprises herein, hopefully. First screen – change announcements, basic details On the first screen, we announce a few changes that will be taking place at this year’s Flock. The most notable one is that we’ll now have partial Flock funding available, in an attempt to fund as many Fedora volunteers as possible to enable them to come to Flock. Another change is the addition of a nominal (~$25 USD) registration fee. We had an unusually high number of no-shows at the last Flock, which cost us funding that could have been used to bring more people to Flock. This registration fee is meant to discourage no-shows and enable more folks to come. Second screen – social details, personal requirements This is the screen where you can …

Flock Cod Logo Ideas

Ryan Lerch put together an initial cut at a Flock 2017 logo and website design (flock2017-WIP branch of fedora-websites). It was an initial cut he offered for me to play with; in trying to work on some logistics for Flock to make sure things happen on time I felt locking in on a final logo design would be helpful at this point. Here is the initial cut of the top part of the website with the first draft logo: Overall, this is very Cape Cod. Ryan created a beautiful piece of work in the landscape illustration and the overall palette. Honestly, this would work fine as-is, but there were a few points of critique for the logo specifically that I decided to explore – There weren’t any standard Fedora fonts in it; I considered at least the date text could be in one of the standard Fedora fonts to tie back to Fedora / Flock. The standard ‘Flock’ logotype wasn’t used either; generally we try to keep stuff with logotypes in that logotype (if anything, so it seems more official.) The color palette is excellent and evocative of Cape Cod, but maybe some Fedora accent colors could tie it into …

A logo for cri-o

Dan Walsh recently asked me if I could come up with a logo for a project he is involved with – cri-o. The “cri” of cri-o stands for Container Runtime Interface. The CRI is a different project – the CRI is an API between Kubernetes (container orchestration) and various container runtimes. cri-o is a runtime – like rkt or Docker – that can run containers that are compliant with OCI (Open Containers Initiative) specification. (Some more info on this is here.) Dan and Antonio suggested a couple of ideas at the outset: Since the project means to connect to Kubernetes via the CRI, it might be neat to have some kind of nod to Kubernetes. Kubernetes’ logo is a nautical one (the wheel of a ship, with 7 spokes.) If you say cri-o out loud, it kind of sounds like cyro, e.g., icy-cool like Mr. Freeze from Batman! If we want to go for a mascot, a mammoth might be a neat one (from an icy time.) So I had two initial ideas, riffing off of those: I tried to think of something nautical and frozen that might relate to Kubernetes in a reasonable way given what cri-o actually does. …

Help Fedora Hubs by taking this survey

Here’s a quick and easy way to help Fedora Hubs! Our Outreachy intern, Suzanne Hillman, has put together a survey about Fedora contributors’ usage of social media to help us prioritize potential future integration with various social media platforms with Fedora Hubs. If you’d like your social media hangouts of choice to be considered for integration, please take the survey! Take the survey now!

Helping new users get on IRC, Part 2

Where our story began… You may first want to check out the first part of this blog post, Helping new users get on IRC. We’ll wait for you here. 🙂 A simpler way to choose a nick (Relevant ticket: https://pagure.io/fedora-hubs/issue/283) So Sayan kindly reviewed the ticket with the irc registration mockups in it and had some points of feedback about the nick selection process (original mockup shown below:) Critical Feedback on Original Mockup The layout of a grid of nicks to choose from invited the user to click on all of them, even if that wasn’t in their best interest. It drove their attention to a multiplicity of choices rather than focused them towards one they could use to move forward. If the user clicked even on just one nick, they would have to wait for us to check if it was available. If they clicked on multiple, it could take a long time to get through the dialog. They might give up and not register. (We want them to join and chat, though!) To make it clear which nick they wanted to register, we had the user click on a “Register” button next to every available nick. This meant, …