Binary Bitches: Keeping Open Source Open to Women (SXSW 2012)

Hi there! I’ll post a full synopsis of our panel here when it’s over. For now, we’ll use this blog post to share resources we know we’ll be bringing up during the panel. If you have any questions for us during or after the talk, feel free to post a comment. Update: Xanthe has posted a blog post on this talk. Please check it out: Simple steps for encouraging participation Why Are We Here? (From the SXSW Program) Open source communities pride themselves on the premise of egalitarian communication where every voice is valued, heard and documented. Despite this noble goal, this panel discusses how women and their communication style might nevertheless result in their marginalization or deter them from participating in open source communities in the first place. This dual presentation, moderated by a journalist, brings together two women with different perspectives and experiences working in open source communities. Together they will discuss how the marginalization of women in open source affects process and product outcomes, particularly with regard to design. We will also discuss strategies to improve participation in open source communities both from an industry and educational perspective. We look forward to starting a conversation about problems …

LISA '11 Boston: Women in Tech Panel

Last night I had the pleasure of serving on a panel on “Women in Tech” at the USENIX LISA 2011 conference in Boston. The panel was organized by Chris St. Pierre, moderated by Lois Bennett, and the panelists were Carolyn Rowland, Deb Nicholson, and myself. Lois, Deb, Carolyn and I met for lunch the day of the panel to talk about the points we wanted to hit during the discussion. One of our goals for the session was to not just get awareness out about the issues women in technology face, or to tell our stories, but to come up with action items anyone attending the session could take away from it and put into place to help make the situation better. Lois put together a list of ‘feeder’ questions to get the conversation started and to fill in if there was a lull in the discussion. There weren’t any lulls, as it turned out, but it’s always good to be prepared 🙂 The talk was well-attended by women and men alike. We started out maybe 3/4 full and by the end of the panel it was standing-room-only. Women of WiFi, after Caillebotte by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com, on Flickr. Used …