Linux Install Fests at RPI

Luis Ibanez contacted me last week about obtaining Fedora media for a Linux installfest at my alma mater, RPI (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY.) Linux installfests such as this one are actually a great opportunity to expose more college students to Linux. You see, at RPI (since I was a freshman, actually 🙂 ), there is a laptop program that requires all undergraduate students to have a laptop of at least a certain spec and also offers laptops at a great price for purchase through the school. Today and this coming Sunday are the student laptop distribution days. How better to convince students to install more goodies on their new laptops by staking out a location near where the laptops are being distributed and helping them install a dual-boot with Linux, a Linux VM, or even a complete replacement of Windows? So that is exactly what the RPI Center for Open Source, RPI ACM/LUG, and Open Source Software course students are doing today and Sunday. You can see the goodies I sent for the cause below. Since the RPI laptops are 64-bit, we made sure there would be 64-bit media available, but it’s also good to have 32-bit media …

Mini-Education Summit LinuxCon Boston 2010

I spent most of last week at LinuxCon helping Spot at the Fedora booth. However, the day before the main conference, Sebastian Dziallas organized a Education Mini-Summit to take place in conjunction with LinuxCon. I gave a talk on the Inkscape class Red Hat has done plus some other related initiatives, including one we are planning for next fall with the Free Software Foundation. The slides are available here. There were so many great talks. Here’s an overview of the ones I attended (my apologies for having no details on Caroline Meek’s talk on “Computers in US Schools: Realities and Challenges and how Open Source can help” – I had to leave before her talk for the FSF Women’s Caucus dinner in Cambridge.) “Can Open Source Save The World…?” Bryant Patten, NCOSE Bryant split his talk into three sections: the bad news, the good news, and the better news. The Bad News Here’s an overview of the points Bryant made in this section: Waiting for Superman, Two Million Minutes: A Global Examination, The Global Achievement Gap by Tony Wagner, What the internet is doing to our brains: the Shallows by Nicholas Carr are books and films that discuss some of …

Rensselaer Center for Open Source (RCOS) talk on Fedora

So a couple of weeks ago, as I mentioned previously, I made a couple of trips out to my alma-mater Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. First, my co-worker John and I ran the Red Hat booth at the RPI Spring 2010 Career Fair. We were there for a little over four hours and by the end of it I had all but lost my voice. As one might expect at a school like RPI, every person who came up to speak to me (except for a biology major) knew exactly what Linux was, and the majority of them ran or had at least tried Linux themselves. Ben Boeckel, a current RPI student as well as Fedora contributor, dropped by so I got to say hi to him at the career fair as well. A couple of days later I drove back out to RPI to give a talk on how to get involved in Fedora at the Rensselaer Center for Open Source meeting. Professor Mukkai Krishnamoorthy, one of the directors of RCOS and a much-beloved RPI CS professor, made all the arrangements for the talk. Now, the Rensselaer Center for Open Source is an initiative to support RPI …