The Wall of Anaconda

I set this wall of Anaconda mockups up in the office today. Hope I don’t get in trouble 🙂 What I really want is a nice tool for doing the same online. I’ve been using Mediawiki for a long time, but it’s not the most user-friendly from the POV of folks trying to leave feedback. Mediawiki also only has one axis – you can see here I have major sections horizontally, with variations on each section vertically. A combination of Mediawiki + Notitie would be nice at least. I have this set up on my own private server but nothing public.

What's your partitioning persona? And, the partitioning UI thus far.

Partitioning personas Redesigning the UI for something as complex as an OS installer has the potential to be disruptive to some classes of users, so in designing and re-designing and re-re-designing the partitioning screens for Fedora’s installer, we’d like to make sure you’re going to be covered. Do any of these cases describe you, and if not, can you let me know how you use the partitioning functionality of Anaconda or really any OS installer so I can account for your use case? The partitioning UI thus far What are we doing to the installer’s partitioning UI to bring us to ask such questions? What is all this redesigning that’s going on? Well, let’s talk about partitioning as it works today in Anaconda. Note that this is a screenshot of Red Hat Linux 8.0 from 2002, almost 10 years ago now. Aside from the online help / release notes pane on the left which has long since been dropped, this partitioning screen does not look much different today. Our partitioning UI is currently very technology-centric. I suspect users care a lot more about the mountpoint layout of their OS with the technology underneath having a less primary role for them. …

LISA '11 Boston: Women in Tech Panel

Last night I had the pleasure of serving on a panel on “Women in Tech” at the USENIX LISA 2011 conference in Boston. The panel was organized by Chris St. Pierre, moderated by Lois Bennett, and the panelists were Carolyn Rowland, Deb Nicholson, and myself. Lois, Deb, Carolyn and I met for lunch the day of the panel to talk about the points we wanted to hit during the discussion. One of our goals for the session was to not just get awareness out about the issues women in technology face, or to tell our stories, but to come up with action items anyone attending the session could take away from it and put into place to help make the situation better. Lois put together a list of ‘feeder’ questions to get the conversation started and to fill in if there was a lull in the discussion. There weren’t any lulls, as it turned out, but it’s always good to be prepared 🙂 The talk was well-attended by women and men alike. We started out maybe 3/4 full and by the end of the panel it was standing-room-only. Women of WiFi, after Caillebotte by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com, on Flickr. Used …

Firewall Zones UI Design

Over the past couple of months I have been working with Thomas Woerner on some enhancements to and new UI for Fedora’s firewall controls. These additions are part of Thomas’s work in adding the concept of firewall ‘zones’ to Fedora to simplify firewall configuration and help make it easier for folks to keep their computers safe. Today, we provide users with a lot of control over their firewall in the system-config-firewall, but the problem with our current model is that with a laptop, you may connect to multiple different networks during the course of the day, and firewall rules that make sense for one network might not make much sense or may even be dangerous on another network. An example of this is if you’re sitting at home or at the office, you can pretty much trust the other systems on your network (well, at least if you’re at my office where we don’t have Windows systems 😉 ), so you might want to have your httpd service running if you’re a web developer and want to show others working links to web application code running on your laptop. However, when you’re at a coffeeshop with other systems on the …