Keeping it clean

Photo credit: Adan Garcia on Flickr. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License. Is the life you’re pursuing the life you want? by Erin Doland on unclutterer.com is an interesting read if you replace ‘life’ with ‘software application’ or ‘operating system’…. especially here: What are you doing on autopilot? What are you doing only because it’s a traditional behavior?… If you don’t know why you’re moving in a new direction, if you can’t envision a remarkable life for yourself, you will struggle with every attempt you make to get rid of clutter. Getting rid of stuff you have and don’t need What you don’t include in your UI / application / OS is just as important as what you do. I recently went through an apartment de-cluttering. Yes, the new absence of many things, overall, has improved my apartment greatly. Maybe this will work for your application as well? Certainly, no one wants their application to relate to these sorts of monstrosities! It can be hard to purge the vestiges or mistakes of your application’s past. A lot of ‘uncluttering’ literature consistently suggests the following method of removing items from your home: take a photo …

FLOSS HCI Workshop at CHI 2010 Atlanta

Introduction CHI is the ACM Human Factors in Computing Systems annual conference. Last year, CHI was in my ‘hometown’ of Boston, and I attended the one day that had a few sessions on FLOSS and HCI back then, including a panel session on Open Source UX organized by Scooter Morris and Bonnie John. I was really excited to see all of the interest in FLOSS, and very happy to see it carried on this year, since Michael Terry and Paula Bach organized a full-day FLOSS HCI Workshop at CHI 2010 in Atlanta, GA. I shared my submission with you earlier, and I’m hoping the submissions of other attendees are going to be available as well soon. HCI Speed Dating Anyhow, here is my run-down of the day. I arrived exactly an hour late (flight delay) and was dismayed to see that I completely missed the introductions. Michael and Paula had a cool idea for kicking things off after that though – speed dating! The workshop was split pretty 50/50 FLOSS practitioners/academics, so all the academics lined up on the left, and all the FLOSS practitioners lined up on the right, and we gave each other 30 second (well in some …

Contributing to free & open source software as a designer

Next Sunday there’s going to be a FLOSS HCI Workshop at CHI 2010 in Atlanta, GA. CHI is the annual conference on human-computer interaction’ [1] for ACM’s SIG CHI (Special Interest Group in Computer-Human Interaction.) Michael Terry from the University of Waterloo and Paula Bach from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have organized this workshop for both folks in the academic HCI community and HCI folks from the open source community. It’s going to be an opportunity for folks from either or both groups to get together and to share knowledge and propose directions for research both to help inform HCI tools and to further the user experience in free/libre and open source software. My submission for the workshop was a 12-page case study [2] from my own experiences of being a designer in the Fedora community, on the Fedora Design Team. I wanted to post this before the workshop to get your feedback on it so I can bring it up during the workshop when I attend it next week! Let me know if there’s anything in there that’s wrong, anything that might have been forgotten, or honestly any other points at all you would like to see …

Contributing to free & open source software as a designer

Next Sunday there’s going to be a FLOSS HCI Workshop at CHI 2010 in Atlanta, GA. CHI is the annual conference on human-computer interaction’ [1] for ACM’s SIG CHI (Special Interest Group in Computer-Human Interaction.) Michael Terry from the University of Waterloo and Paula Bach from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have organized this workshop for both folks in the academic HCI community and HCI folks from the open source community. It’s going to be an opportunity for folks from either or both groups to get together and to share knowledge and propose directions for research both to help inform HCI tools and to further the user experience in free/libre and open source software. My submission for the workshop was a 12-page case study [2] from my own experiences of being a designer in the Fedora community, on the Fedora Design Team. I wanted to post this before the workshop to get your feedback on it so I can bring it up during the workshop when I attend it next week! Let me know if there’s anything in there that’s wrong, anything that might have been forgotten, or honestly any other points at all you would like to see …

An icon

With the help of seasoned GNOME artists Lapo Calamandrei, Hylke Bons, and Jakub Steiner, I was able to create the following GNOME-y icons: I used the already-existing clock icon, stripped down it down to its bare face, and layered the fuel gauge type stuff on top. I don’t often get the chance to create icons (certainly not at all the sizes pictured here) and I’m hoping to get better at it. Of course I still have to try my hand at a high-res (256x256px) version… 🙂 The Inkscape SVG source is available.