See you at RPI!

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or more affectionately known as RPI, is my alma mater. It was pretty clear to me early on that it was the right school for me. Behold, the RPI campus computing center (Voorhees Computing Center): That’s right, it’s inside of a church – they take computing seriously at RPI – obviously a great place to recruit current and future free & open source hackers! 🙂 I’ll be at the RPI Spring 2010 Career Fair in Troy, NY with my colleague John (who also started the Inkscape class project) – we’ll be representing Red Hat as two past RPI students. If you are an RPI student and are interested in a career at Red Hat, please stop by our booth at the Armory between 12 – 5 pm tomorrow – say hi and see what opportunities we might have for you! By the way, I’ll be back on campus this Friday, February 5th to give a talk about Fedora, from 4-5 PM in JEC 3117. More details are at the Rensselaer Center for Open Source website. I’ll have plenty of Fedora swag, so if you’re in the capital region and are interested please stop by and say hi …

Inkscape Class Day 6

Yesterday morning, I taught the sixth session of an 8-session (40 minutes per session) course on Inkscape at a Boston-area middle school. (For more general details about the class check out my blog post on day 1.) Yesterday’s Class Yesterday’s class, like last Thursday’s class, was primarily a working class. After this class we have only two sessions left, and the students’ artwork is due at the end of next session, so we’ve been giving them as much time as possible during class to work on their designs. When I passed out the shirt size signup sheet last week, one of the students was absent, so I got his size and sent Walter at EmbroidMe Chelmsford a quick email listing of all the T-shirt sizes we’d need so he would be ready to have the shirts printed when we send the designs on Friday. I gave some quick instructions on working with the align & distribute tool in Inkscape – since we are getting close to the end of class, I thought going over alignments would be helpful for the students in making final preparations for their artwork to be handed off. One of the scenarios I used to explain …